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Nature. 2014 Feb 20;506(7488):307-15. doi: 10.1038/nature13068.

The rise of oxygen in Earth's early ocean and atmosphere.

Author information

1
Department of Earth Sciences, University of California, Riverside, California 92521, USA.
2
1] Department of Earth Sciences, University of California, Riverside, California 92521, USA [2] Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA [3] School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA.
3
1] Department of Earth Sciences, University of California, Riverside, California 92521, USA [2] Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA.

Abstract

The rapid increase of carbon dioxide concentration in Earth's modern atmosphere is a matter of major concern. But for the atmosphere of roughly two-and-half billion years ago, interest centres on a different gas: free oxygen (O2) spawned by early biological production. The initial increase of O2 in the atmosphere, its delayed build-up in the ocean, its increase to near-modern levels in the sea and air two billion years later, and its cause-and-effect relationship with life are among the most compelling stories in Earth's history.

PMID:
24553238
DOI:
10.1038/nature13068
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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