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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2014 Mar;103(3):e14-7. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2013.12.050. Epub 2014 Jan 8.

Anthropometric measures of abdominal adiposity for the identification of cardiometabolic risk factors in adolescents.

Author information

1
Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
2
Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, United States; Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
3
Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, United States; Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
4
Clinical and Translational Research Center, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
5
Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, United States; University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
6
Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, United States; University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, United States. Electronic address: lipman@upenn.nursing.edu.

Abstract

Sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) was obtained in 65 adolescents referred for assessment of cardiometabolic risk. We found that SAD was associated with cardiometabolic risk factors independent of BMI in males, but that SAD was not superior to BMI or other measures of abdominal adiposity for the detection of metabolic syndrome.

KEYWORDS:

Body mass index; Metabolic syndrome; Sagittal abdominal diameter; Waist circumference

PMID:
24552682
PMCID:
PMC4384445
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabres.2013.12.050
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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