Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Psychiatry Med. 2013;46(2):153-67.

Factors associated with perceived feasibility and willingness of non-psychiatric doctors in Japan to treat depressed patients.

Author information

1
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Okayama University Hospital and National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Japan. masatoshiinagaki@okayama-u.ac.jp
2
National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Japan.
3
Osaka Shoin Women's University, Japan.
4
Osaka Association of Psychiatric Clinics, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We previously reported that many non-psychiatric doctors in Japan believe that treating depression was not part of their duties. Educational interventions must address motivation of physicians to play a role in depression care. In this study, we explored factors associated with perceived feasibility and willingness of non-psychiatric doctors in Japan to treat depression.

METHODS:

The study population included non-psychiatric doctors of the General Physician-Psychiatrist (G-P) Network group in Japan. We explored perceived feasibility and willingness to treat depressed patients, and examined preliminary associations with attitudes toward depression (the Depression Attitude Questionnaire: DAQ) and current depression treatment in routine medical practice.

RESULTS:

Responses were obtained from 56 non-psychiatric doctors (response rate: 35.4%). The doctors who scored high on the "Professional" and "Pessimism" subscale of the DAQ believed that treating depressed patients was not feasible (chi2 = 13.6, p < 0.01; chi2 = 7.3, p < 0.05, respectively) and were not willing to treat depressed patients (chi2 = 9.4, p < 0.01; chi2 = 6.6, p < 0.05, respectively) as part of their routine medical practice. The doctors who scored high on the "Professional" subscale referred fewer depressed patients to psychiatrists (r = -0.33, p < 0.05), and those who scored high on the "Pessimism" subscale recognized fewer depressed patients (r = -0.39, p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

The present study showed that attitudes toward depression were associated with perceived feasibility and willingness to treat depressed patients and with under-diagnosis of depression. Educational interventions optimized for these attitudes should be developed to improve recognition and treatment of depression in Japan.

PMID:
24552039
DOI:
10.2190/PM.46.2.c
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Support Center