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Trends Biochem Sci. 2014 Mar;39(3):141-9. doi: 10.1016/j.tibs.2014.01.003. Epub 2014 Feb 14.

DNA damage: RNA-binding proteins protect from near and far.

Author information

1
Institut Curie, Centre de Recherche, Orsay, France; CNRS UMR3348, Genotoxic Stress and Cancer, Centre Universitaire, Orsay, France.
2
Institut Curie, Centre de Recherche, Orsay, France; CNRS UMR3348, Genotoxic Stress and Cancer, Centre Universitaire, Orsay, France. Electronic address: stephan.vagner@curie.fr.

Abstract

Recent work, including large-scale genetic and molecular analyses, identified RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) as major players in the prevention of genome instability. These studies show that RBPs prevent harmful RNA/DNA hybrids and are involved in the DNA damage response (DDR), from DNA repair to cell survival decisions. Indeed, specific RBPs allow the selective regulation of DDR genes at multiple post-transcriptional levels (from pre-mRNA splicing/polyadenylation to mRNA stability/translation) and are directly involved in DNA repair. These multiple activities are mediated by RBP binding to mRNAs, nascent transcripts, noncoding RNAs, and damaged DNA. Finally, because DNA damage modifies RBP localization and binding to different RNA/DNA molecules, we propose that upon DNA damage, RBPs coordinately regulate various aspects of both RNA and DNA metabolism.

KEYWORDS:

DNA damage response; RNA processing; mRNA translation; post-transcriptional control of gene expression

PMID:
24534650
DOI:
10.1016/j.tibs.2014.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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