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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Apr 29;63(16):1626-33. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2013.12.042. Epub 2014 Feb 26.

Achievement of optimal medical therapy goals for U.S. adults with coronary artery disease: results from the REGARDS Study (REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke).

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. Electronic address: tmbrown@uab.edu.
2
Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.
3
Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
4
Department of Biostatistics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
5
Department of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont.
6
Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, Colorado.
7
Department of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
8
Huntsville Hospital, Huntsville, Alabama.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

In a nonclinical trial setting, we sought to determine the proportion of individuals with coronary artery disease (CAD) with optimal risk factor levels based on the COURAGE (Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive DruG Evaluation) trial.

BACKGROUND:

In the COURAGE trial, the addition of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to optimal medical therapy did not reduce the risk of death or myocardial infarction in stable CAD patients but resulted in more revascularization procedures.

METHODS:

The REGARDS (REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke) study is a national prospective cohort study of 30,239 African-American and white community-dwelling individuals older than 45 years of age who enrolled in 2003 through 2007. We calculated the proportion of 3,167 participants with self-reported CAD meeting 7 risk factor goals based on the COURAGE trial: 1) aspirin use; 2) systolic blood pressure <130 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure <85 mm Hg (<80 mm Hg if diabetic); 3) low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <85 mg/dl, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol >40 mg/dl, and triglycerides <150 mg/dl; 4) fasting glucose <126 mg/dl; 5) nonsmoking status; 6) body mass index <25 kg/m(2); and 7) exercise ≥4 days per week.

RESULTS:

The mean age of participants was 69 ± 9 years; 33% were African American and 35% were female. Overall, the median number of goals met was 4. Less than one-fourth met ≥5 of the 7 goals, and 16% met all 3 goals for aspirin, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Older age, white race, higher income, more education, and higher physical functioning were independently associated with meeting more goals.

CONCLUSIONS:

There is substantial room for improvement in risk factor reduction among U.S. individuals with CAD.

KEYWORDS:

coronary artery disease; prevention; risk factors

PMID:
24534599
PMCID:
PMC4201851
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2013.12.042
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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