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Epilepsy Behav. 2014 Mar;32:114-20. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2014.01.010. Epub 2014 Feb 14.

Advantages of sentence-level fMRI language tasks in presurgical language mapping for temporal lobe epilepsy.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Krembil Neuroscience Centre & Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: alexander.barnett@mail.utoronto.ca.
2
Krembil Neuroscience Centre & Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Krembil Neuroscience Centre & Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

fMRI language mapping has become increasingly utilized for determining language dominance before surgical intervention for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). This study aimed to examine the differences between two classes of fMRI word generation tasks used in our clinic: tasks using a single word cue, referred to as simple generative tasks (SGTs), and tasks also involving sentence-level processing, referred to as sentence-level language tasks (SLTs). Specifically, we aimed to investigate the extent and laterality of activation and frontal-temporal connectivity during these language tasks and their relationship to clinical language measures. Thirty-one patients with TLE (18 patients with left TLE and 13 patients with right TLE) performed four language tasks during an fMRI scan, two SGTs and two SLTs. We found significantly greater activity for SLTs over SGTs in bilateral inferior frontal and middle temporal gyri and the left temporal pole. Sentence-level language tasks also showed greater lateralization compared with SGTs. Finally, we found that while activation extent did not correlate with clinical language tests, the degree of left frontal-temporal connectivity was significantly correlated with naming and semantic fluency performance. These correlations also were more robust for SLTs than for SGTs. Taken together, these results provide a compelling argument for including some form of SLTs in fMRI language lateralization protocols for TLE as they allow for better characterization of language networks, particularly in the temporal lobes which are at risk in surgery.

KEYWORDS:

Fluency; Frontal lobe; Functional connectivity; Language lateralization; Naming; Temporal lobe

PMID:
24534479
DOI:
10.1016/j.yebeh.2014.01.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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