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Curr Opin Immunol. 2014 Apr;27:46-52. doi: 10.1016/j.coi.2014.01.008. Epub 2014 Feb 15.

Manipulating immune cells for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer.

Author information

1
Cancer Immunology Program, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Australia; Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia; Department of Immunology, Monash University, Clayton, Australia. Electronic address: phil.darcy@petermac.org.
2
Cancer Immunology Program, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Australia; Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.
3
Cancer Immunology Program, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Australia; Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia; Department of Immunology, Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
4
Cancer Immunology Program, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Australia; Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia; Department of Immunology, Monash University, Clayton, Australia. Electronic address: michael.kershaw@petermac.org.

Abstract

The immune system can be induced to respond against cancer with some success reported in clinical trials using a range of approaches including vaccines and antibodies. In addition to these approaches, cell based therapies are demonstrating much promise as potential therapies for cancer. In cell therapies autologous patient leukocytes are isolated and manipulated in vitro before transfer back to the patient in adoptive transfer regimens. The majority of approaches utilize conventional T cells or dendritic cells, but a wide variety of other types of leukocytes exist which can possess anti-cancer activity. In this review, we present a brief overview of T cell adoptive cell transfer followed by a review of approaches using alternate lymphocyte subsets and other leukocytes including neutrophils, macrophages and eosinophils.

PMID:
24534448
DOI:
10.1016/j.coi.2014.01.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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