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Fertil Steril. 2014 May;101(5):1359-66. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2014.01.022. Epub 2014 Feb 15.

Urinary bisphenol A, phthalates, and couple fecundity: the Longitudinal Investigation of Fertility and the Environment (LIFE) Study.

Author information

1
Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Rockville, Maryland. Electronic address: louisg@mail.nih.gov.
2
Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Rockville, Maryland.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Texas A&M Rural School of Public Health, College Station, Texas.
4
Division of Environmental Health Sciences, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The University at Albany, Albany, New York.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the relationship between environmental chemicals and couple fecundity or time to pregnancy (TTP).

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort.

SETTING:

Communities of targeted populations with reported exposure.

PATIENT(S):

501 couples recruited upon discontinuing contraception to become pregnant, 2005-2009.

INTERVENTION(S):

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Fecundability odds ratios (FORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) estimated for each partner's chemical concentrations adjusted for age, body mass index, cotinine, creatinine, and research site while accounting for time off contraception.

RESULT(S):

Couples completed interviews and anthropometric assessments and provided the urine specimens for quantification of bisphenol A (BPA) and 14 phthalate metabolites, which were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer. Women recorded menstruation and pregnancy test results in daily journals. Couples were evaluated until a positive human-chorionic gonadotropin pregnancy test or 12 cycles without pregnancy. Neither female nor male BPA concentration was associated with TTP (FOR 0.98; 95% CI, 0.86, 1.13 and FOR 1.04; 95% CI, 0.91, 1.18, respectively). Men's urinary concentrations of monomethyl, mono-n-butyl, and monobenzyl phthalates were associated with a longer TTP (FOR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.70, 0.93; FOR 0.82, 95% CI, 0.70, 0.97; and FOR 0.77, 95% CI, 0.65 0.92, respectively).

CONCLUSION(S):

Select male but not female phthalate exposures were associated with an approximately 20% reduction in fecundity, underscoring the importance of assessing both partners' exposure to minimize erroneous conclusions.

KEYWORDS:

Bisphenol A; endocrine disrupting chemicals; fecundity; phthalates; reproduction

PMID:
24534276
PMCID:
PMC4008721
DOI:
10.1016/j.fertnstert.2014.01.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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