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Physiol Behav. 2014 Apr 10;128:247-51. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.02.004. Epub 2014 Feb 14.

Genetic predisposition, dietary restraint and disinhibition in relation to short and long-term weight loss.

Author information

1
Maastricht University, Department of Human Biology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: s.verhoef@maastrichtuniversity.nl.
2
Maastricht University, Department of Human Biology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Interindividual differences in response to weight loss and maintenance thereafter are ascribed to genetic predisposition and behavioral changes.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine whether body weight and short and long-term body weight loss were affected by candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and changes in eating behavior or by an interaction between these genetic and behavioral factors.

METHODS:

150 healthy subjects (39 males, 111 females) aged 20-50 y with a BMI of 27-38 kg/m(2) followed a very low energy diet for 8-weeks, followed by a 3-month weight maintenance period. SNPs were selected from six candidate genes: ADRB2, FTO, MC4R, PPARG, PPARD, and PPARGC1A. Changes in eating behavior were determined with the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire.

RESULTS:

A high genetic predisposition score was associated with a high body weight at baseline and more short-term weight loss. From the six selected obesity-related SNPs, FTO was associated with increased body weight at baseline, and the effect allele of PPARGC1A was positively associated with short-term weight loss, when assessed for each SNP separately. Long-term weight loss was associated with a larger increase in dietary restraint and larger decrease in disinhibition.

CONCLUSION:

During long-term weight loss, genetic effects are dominated by changes in eating behavior.

KEYWORDS:

Dietary restraint; Disinhibition; Single nucleotide polymorphism; Weight loss

PMID:
24534181
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.02.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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