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Genome Biol Evol. 2014 Mar;6(3):474-81. doi: 10.1093/gbe/evu031.

Archaeal "dark matter" and the origin of eukaryotes.

Author information

1
Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Current hypotheses about the history of cellular life are mainly based on analyses of cultivated organisms, but these represent only a small fraction of extant biodiversity. The sequencing of new environmental lineages therefore provides an opportunity to test, revise, or reject existing ideas about the tree of life and the origin of eukaryotes. According to the textbook three domains hypothesis, the eukaryotes emerge as the sister group to a monophyletic Archaea. However, recent analyses incorporating better phylogenetic models and an improved sampling of the archaeal domain have generally supported the competing eocyte hypothesis, in which core genes of eukaryotic cells originated from within the Archaea, with important implications for eukaryogenesis. Given this trend, it was surprising that a recent analysis incorporating new genomes from uncultivated Archaea recovered a strongly supported three domains tree. Here, we show that this result was due in part to the use of a poorly fitting phylogenetic model and also to the inclusion by an automated pipeline of genes of putative bacterial origin rather than nucleocytosolic versions for some of the eukaryotes analyzed. When these issues were resolved, analyses including the new archaeal lineages placed core eukaryotic genes within the Archaea. These results are consistent with a number of recent studies in which improved archaeal sampling and better phylogenetic models agree in supporting the eocyte tree over the three domains hypothesis.

KEYWORDS:

Tree of Life; eukaryogenesis; phylogenetics; “dark matter”

PMID:
24532674
PMCID:
PMC3971582
DOI:
10.1093/gbe/evu031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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