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J Appl Genet. 2014 May;55(2):183-8. doi: 10.1007/s13353-014-0195-z. Epub 2014 Feb 15.

Mutational screening of EXT1 and EXT2 genes in Polish patients with hereditary multiple exostoses.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Genetics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Rokietnicka 8 Street, 60-806, Poznan, Poland, jamsheer@wp.pl.

Abstract

Hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) also known as multiple osteochondromas represent one of the most frequent bone tumor disorder in humans. Its clinical presentation is characterized by the presence of multiple benign cartilage-capped tumors located most commonly in the juxta-epiphyseal portions of long bones. HME are usually inherited in autosomal dominant manner, however de novo mutations can also occur. In most patients, the disease is caused by alterations in the EXT1 and EXT2 genes. In this study we investigated 33 unrelated Polish probands with the clinical and radiological diagnosis of HME by means of Sanger sequencing and MLPA for all coding exons of EXT1 and EXT2. We demonstrated EXT1 and EXT2 heterozygous mutations in 18 (54.6 %) and ten (30.3 %) probands respectively, which represents a total of 28 (84.9 %) index cases. Sequencing allowed for the detection of causative changes in 26 (78.8 %) probands, whereas MLPA showed intragenic deletions in two (6.1 %) further cases (15 mutations represented novel changes). Our paper is the first report on the results of exhaustive mutational screening of both EXT1/EXT2 genes in Polish patients. The proportion of EXT1/EXT2 mutations in our group was similar to other Caucasian cohorts. However, we found that EXT1 lesions in Polish patients cluster in exons 1 and 2 (55.6 % of all EXT1 mutations). This important finding should lead to the optimization of cost-effectiveness rate of HME diagnostic testing. Therefore, the diagnostic algorithm for HME should include EXT1 sequencing (starting with exons 1-2), followed by EXT2 sequencing, and MLPA/qPCR for intragenic copy number changes.

PMID:
24532482
PMCID:
PMC3990859
DOI:
10.1007/s13353-014-0195-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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