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Vaccine. 2014 Apr 7;32(17):1946-53. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.01.090. Epub 2014 Feb 13.

Associations between race, sex and immune response variations to rubella vaccination in two independent cohorts.

Author information

1
Mayo Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Guggenheim 611C, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, United States; Program in Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, United States.
2
Mayo Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Guggenheim 611C, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, United States.
3
Division of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, United States.
4
Mayo Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Guggenheim 611C, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, United States; Program in Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, United States; Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, United States. Electronic address: poland.gregory@mayo.edu.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Immune response variations after vaccination are influenced by host genetic factors and demographic variables, such as race, ethnicity and sex. The latter have not been systematically studied in regard to live rubella vaccine, but are of interest for developing next generation vaccines for diverse populations, for predicting immune responses after vaccination, and for better understanding the variables that impact immune response.

METHODS:

We assessed associations between demographic variables, including race, ethnicity and sex, and rubella-specific neutralizing antibody levels and secreted cytokines (IFNγ, IL-6) in two independent cohorts (1994 subjects), using linear and linear mixed models approaches, and genetically defined racial and ethnic categorizations.

RESULTS:

Our replicated findings in two independent, large, racially diverse cohorts indicate that individuals of African descent have significantly higher rubella-specific neutralizing antibody levels compared to individuals of European descent and/or Hispanic ethnicity (p<0.001).

CONCLUSION:

Our study provides consistent evidence for racial/ethnic differences in humoral immune response following rubella vaccination.

KEYWORDS:

Antibodies; Cellular immunity; Ethnicity; MMR; Race; Rubella vaccine; Sex

PMID:
24530932
PMCID:
PMC3980440
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.01.090
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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