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Hum Mov Sci. 2014 Apr;34:109-19. doi: 10.1016/j.humov.2014.01.005. Epub 2014 Feb 14.

Similar changes in muscle fiber phenotype with differentiated consequences for rate of force development: endurance versus resistance training.

Author information

1
Section of Sport Science, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. Electronic address: jean@sport.au.dk.
2
Section of Sport Science, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.

Abstract

Resistance training has been shown to positively affect the rate of force development (RFD) whereas there is currently no data on the effect of endurance training on RFD. Subjects completed ten weeks of either resistance training (RT, n=7) or endurance cycling (END, n=7). Pre and post measurements included biopsies obtained from m. vastus lateralis to quantify fiber phenotype and fiber area and isokinetic dynamometer tests to quantify maximal torque (Nm) and RFD (Nm/s) at 0-30, 0-50, 0-100 and 0-200ms during maximal isometric contraction for both knee extensors and flexors. Both groups increased the area percentage of type IIa fibers (p<.01) and decreased the area percentage of type IIx fibers (p=.05), whereas only RT increased fiber size (p<.05). RT significantly increased eccentric, concentric and isometric strength for both knee extensors and flexors, whereas END did not. RT increased 200ms RFD (p<.01) in knee flexor RFD and a tendency towards an increase at 100ms (p<.1), whereas tendencies towards decreases were observed for the END group at 30, 50 and 100ms (p<.1), resulting in RT having a higher RFD than END at post (p<.01). In conclusion, resistance training may be very important for maintaining RFD, whereas endurance training may negatively impact RFD.

KEYWORDS:

Eccentric strength; Fiber type; Hamstring muscles; Rate of force development

PMID:
24530017
DOI:
10.1016/j.humov.2014.01.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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