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Placenta. 2014 Mar;35(3):202-6. doi: 10.1016/j.placenta.2014.01.008. Epub 2014 Jan 31.

Placental perfusion in normal pregnancy and early and late preeclampsia: a magnetic resonance imaging study.

Author information

1
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: sara.sohlberg@kbh.uu.se.
2
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: ajlana.lutvica@kbh.uu.se.
3
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: peter.lindgren@kbh.uu.se.
4
Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: francisco.ortiz-nieto@radiol.uu.se.
5
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: anna-karin.wikstrom@kbh.uu.se.
6
Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: johan.wikstrom@radiol.uu.se.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our primary aim was to investigate if women with early or late preeclampsia have different placental perfusion compared with normal pregnancies. A secondary aim was to investigate if placental perfusion changes with increasing gestational age in normal pregnancy.

METHODS:

The study population included thirteen women with preeclampsia (five with early and eight with late preeclampsia) and nineteen women with normal pregnancy (ten with early and nine with late pregnancy). Early was defined as <34 weeks and late as ≥ 34 weeks gestation. All women underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination including a diffusion weighted sequence at 1.5 T. The perfusion fraction was calculated.

RESULTS:

Women with early preeclampsia had a smaller placental perfusion fraction (p = 0.001) and women with late preeclampsia had a larger placental perfusion fraction (p = 0.011), compared to women with normal pregnancies at the corresponding gestational age. The placental perfusion fraction decreased with increasing gestational age in normal pregnancies (p = 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

Both early and late preeclampsia differ in placental perfusion from normal pregnant women. Observed differences are however in the opposite direction, suggesting differences in pathophysiology. Placental perfusion decreases with increasing gestational age in normal pregnancy.

KEYWORDS:

Early preeclampsia; IVIM; Late preeclampsia; Magnetic resonance imaging; Perfusion; Placenta

PMID:
24529946
DOI:
10.1016/j.placenta.2014.01.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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