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J Biomech. 2014 Mar 21;47(5):1220-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2013.12.018. Epub 2014 Jan 22.

Accuracy and precision of gait events derived from motion capture in horses during walk and trot.

Author information

1
University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Department of Large Animal Sciences, Hojbakkegaard Allé 5, 2630 Taastrup, Denmark.
2
The Royal Veterinary College, Department of Clinical Sciences and Services, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, AL9 7TA, United Kingdom.
3
University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Department of Large Animal Sciences, Hojbakkegaard Allé 5, 2630 Taastrup, Denmark; The Royal Veterinary College, Department of Clinical Sciences and Services, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, AL9 7TA, United Kingdom. Electronic address: eo@sund.ku.dk.

Abstract

This study aimed to create an evidence base for detection of stance-phase timings from motion capture in horses. The objective was to compare the accuracy (bias) and precision (SD) for five published algorithms for the detection of hoof-on and hoof-off using force plates as the reference standard. Six horses were walked and trotted over eight force plates surrounded by a synchronised 12-camera infrared motion capture system. The five algorithms (A-E) were based on: (A) horizontal velocity of the hoof; (B) Fetlock angle and horizontal hoof velocity; (C) horizontal displacement of the hoof relative to the centre of mass; (D) horizontal velocity of the hoof relative to the Centre of Mass and; (E) vertical acceleration of the hoof. A total of 240 stance phases in walk and 240 stance phases in trot were included in the assessment. Method D provided the most accurate and precise results in walk for stance phase duration with a bias of 4.1% for front limbs and 4.8% for hind limbs. For trot we derived a combination of method A for hoof-on and method E for hoof-off resulting in a bias of -6.2% of stance in the front limbs and method B for the hind limbs with a bias of 3.8% of stance phase duration. We conclude that motion capture yields accurate and precise detection of gait events for horses walking and trotting over ground and the results emphasise a need for different algorithms for front limbs versus hind limbs in trot.

KEYWORDS:

Algorithm; Equine; Gait analysis; Gait event; Hoof-on; Locomotion; Method comparison; Stance

PMID:
24529754
DOI:
10.1016/j.jbiomech.2013.12.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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