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Public Health. 2014 Mar;128(3):268-73. doi: 10.1016/j.puhe.2013.12.004. Epub 2014 Feb 13.

Health Belief Model applied to non-compliance with HPV vaccine among female university students.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Nursing, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. Electronic address: elizadonadiki5@hotmail.com.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health and Medical Immunology and Microbiology, Av. of Athens, Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain.
3
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Nursing, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the reasons for refusal of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, and to explore participants' perceptions and attitudes about Health Belief Model (HBM) constructs (perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, cues to action and self-efficacy) among a sample of female university students.

STUDY DESIGN:

Cross-sectional. A self-administered questionnaire based on the HBM was used.

METHODS:

Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to the data to examine the construct validity of the six factor models extracted from the HBM. The predictors of non-HPV vaccination were determined by logistic regression models, using non-HPV vaccination as the dependent variable.

RESULTS:

The sample included 2007 students. The participation rate was 88.9% and the percentage of non-vaccination was 71.65%. Participants who had high scores for 'general perceived barriers', 'perceived barriers to vaccination', 'no perceived general benefits', 'no perceived specific benefits' and 'no general benefits' were more likely to report being unvaccinated.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings demonstrated the utility of HBM constructs in understanding vaccination intention and uptake. There is an urgent need to improve health promotion and information campaigns to enhance the benefits and reduce the barriers to HPV vaccination.

KEYWORDS:

Health Belief Model; Human papillomavirus; Vaccine

PMID:
24529635
DOI:
10.1016/j.puhe.2013.12.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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