Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Psychiatr Clin North Am. 2014 Mar;37(1):77-89. doi: 10.1016/j.psc.2013.10.001. Epub 2014 Jan 10.

Sleep and fatigue following traumatic brain injury.

Author information

1
School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; Monash-Epworth Rehabilitation Research Centre, Epworth Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address: jennie.ponsford@monash.edu.
2
School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; Monash-Epworth Rehabilitation Research Centre, Epworth Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

This article reviews literature relating to sleep disturbance and fatigue after traumatic brain injury. It discusses the nature and prevalence of sleep disturbances associated with traumatic brain injury and the measures used to assess them. Potential causes are discussed, including damage to sleep-wake regulating centers, disruption of circadian timing of sleep, and secondary causes, such as pain, depression, and anxiety. The nature and assessment of fatigue are discussed, followed by a review of evidence regarding causes. Evidence is reviewed of the consequences of sleep disturbance and fatigue. Potential treatments of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic natures are reviewed.

KEYWORDS:

Attention; Depression; Fatigue; Sleep disturbance; Traumatic brain injury; Treatment

PMID:
24529424
DOI:
10.1016/j.psc.2013.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center