Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Schizophr Res. 2014 Mar;153(1-3):48-53. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2014.01.018. Epub 2014 Feb 13.

Neurocognitive function as a possible marker for remission from clinical high risk for psychosis.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Institute of Human Behavioral Medicine, SNU-MRC, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Seoul National University College of Natural Sciences, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Interdisciplinary Cognitive Science Program, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Institute of Human Behavioral Medicine, SNU-MRC, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Seoul National University College of Natural Sciences, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Interdisciplinary Cognitive Science Program, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: kwonjs@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent studies revealed that nonconverters at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis comprise those who later remit from initial CHR state and those who do not remit and continue to have attenuated positive symptoms. CHR subjects who remit symptomatically are comparable to healthy controls for both baseline and longitudinal symptoms. However, the neurocognitive characteristics of this population are still obscure.

METHODS:

Seventy-five CHR subjects and 61 healthy controls were recruited, and their neurocognitive functions were assessed. CHR subjects were divided into converter, remitter, and non-remitter groups according to their clinical state during a 12 to 24month follow-up.

RESULTS:

Only the remitter group was comparable to healthy controls in terms of baseline neurocognitive functions. We observed that remitters showed better performance at baseline on tasks of attention, immediate/delayed verbal memory, verbal fluency, and immediate visual memory compared with converters. Moreover, we found that performance on semantic fluency was significantly improved in remitters but declined in non-remitters over the 2-year follow-up; however, there was no significant difference between these two groups at baseline.

CONCLUSION:

CHR nonconverters who later remit from an initial prodromal state do not show reduced neurocognitive functioning compared with healthy controls at baseline. Therefore, an advanced research diagnostic criterion for a CHR state that considers neurocognitive functions is needed to more precisely predict which patients will develop psychosis.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical high risk for psychosis; False positives; Neurocognition; Prediction; Remission; Semantic fluency

PMID:
24529365
DOI:
10.1016/j.schres.2014.01.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center