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Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2014 Mar;118:69-75. doi: 10.1016/j.clineuro.2013.12.019. Epub 2014 Jan 7.

Multiple faces of children and juvenile meningiomas: a report of single-center experience and review of literature.

Author information

1
Students' Research Group at the Department of Neurosurgery, University Children's Hospital, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland. Electronic address: agnieszka.stanuszek@gmail.com.
2
Students' Research Group at the Department of Neurosurgery, University Children's Hospital, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland. Electronic address: paulapiatek89@gmail.com.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, University Children's Hospital, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland. Electronic address: stkwiatkowski@go2.pl.
4
Department of Neuropathology, Chair of Pathomorphology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland. Electronic address: mnadamek@cyf-kr.edu.pl.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Pediatric meningiomas are extremely rare tumors often associated with various medical conditions. This report is an attempt to analyze the clinical behavior, pathological presentation and recommended management of both isolated and neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) related pediatric meningiomas in comparison to their adult counterparts.

METHODS:

The investigated group consisted of three male and six female patients suffering from meningiomas of the central nervous system, who were hospitalized at our department in years 2001-2012.

RESULTS:

In our group three children were diagnosed with NF2. Two were released with a suspicion of that disease. Three patients had multiple meningiomas at the first presentation. The most common manifestation were focal neurological deficits (47%). Meningiomas were mostly located at the brain convexity (29%). Histological examination revealed the domination of fibrous type in our group (29%). Apart from surgical management a preoperative embolization of the tumors' vessels was implemented in two children. Another three children underwent postoperative radiotherapy (RTh), one received a chemotherapy (ChTh).

CONCLUSION:

Meningiomas in children differ from their counterparts in adults. Due to common coexistence of pediatric meningiomas and neurofibromatosis type 2, this group of patients should be taken under strict control, because of high risk of tumor recurrence.

KEYWORDS:

Meningioma; Neurofibromatosis type 2; Pediatric brain tumors; Pediatric meningiomas

PMID:
24529233
DOI:
10.1016/j.clineuro.2013.12.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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