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Cell Host Microbe. 2014 Feb 12;15(2):132-8. doi: 10.1016/j.chom.2014.01.004.

Innate resistance against Toxoplasma gondii: an evolutionary tale of mice, cats, and men.

Author information

1
Immunopathology Laboratory, René Rachou Institute, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation-Minas Gerais, 30190-002, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil; Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Biological Sciences Institute, Federal University of Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil; Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605-02324, USA. Electronic address: ritoga@cpqrr.fiocruz.br.
2
Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Biological Sciences Institute, Federal University of Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.
3
Institute for Genetics, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne, Germany.
4
Institute for Genetics, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne, Germany; Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, Rua da Quinta Grande 6, 2780-156 Oeiras, Portugal. Electronic address: jhoward@igc.gulbenkian.pt.
5
Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: asher@niaid.nih.gov.

Abstract

Recent studies have revealed remarkable species specificity of the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) TLR11 and TLR12 and the immunity-related GTPase (IRG) proteins that are essential elements for detection and immune control of Toxoplasma gondii in mice, but not in humans. The biological and evolutionary implications of these findings for the T. gondii host-pathogen relationship and for human disease are discussed.

PMID:
24528860
PMCID:
PMC4006104
DOI:
10.1016/j.chom.2014.01.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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