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Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol. 2014 Mar;117(3):385-91. doi: 10.1016/j.oooo.2014.01.010. Epub 2014 Jan 16.

Detection of calcifications in panoramic radiographs in patients with carotid stenoses ≥50%.

Author information

1
Department of Odontology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: maria.garoff@odont.umu.se.
2
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
3
Associate Professor, Department of Odontology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
4
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
5
Professor, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Carotid stenoses ≥50% are associated with increased risk for stroke that can be reduced by prophylactic carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Calcifications in arteries can be detected in panoramic radiographs (PRs). In a cross-sectional study, we analyzed (1) extirpated plaques for calcification, (2) how often PRs disclosed calcified plaques, (3) how often patients with stenoses ≥50% presented calcifications in PRs, and (4) the additional value of frontal radiographs (FRs).

STUDY DESIGN:

Patients (n = 100) with carotid stenosis ≥50% were examined with PRs and FRs before CEA. Extirpated carotid plaques were radiographically examined (n = 101).

RESULTS:

It was found that 100 of 101 (99%) extirpated plaques were calcified, of which 75 of 100 (75%) were detected in PRs; 84 of 100 (84%) patients presented carotid calcifications in the PRs, in 9.5% contralateral to the stenosis ≥50%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Carotid calcifications are seen in PRs in 84% of patients with carotid stenosis ≥50%, independent of gender. FRs do not contribute significantly to this identification.

PMID:
24528796
DOI:
10.1016/j.oooo.2014.01.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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