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Br Med Bull. 2014;109:31-44. doi: 10.1093/bmb/ldu002. Epub 2014 Feb 12.

A review and update on the current status of retinal prostheses (bionic eye).

Author information

1
Biomedical Research Centre, National Institute of Health Research, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, 162 City Road, London EC1V 2PD, UK.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND:

The Argus® II is the first retinal prosthesis approved for the treatment of patients blind from retinitis pigmentosa (RP), receiving CE (Conformité Européenne) marking in March 2011 and FDA approval in February 2013. Alpha-IMS followed closely and obtained CE marking in July 2013. Other devices are being developed, some of which are currently in clinical trials.

SOURCES OF DATA:

A systematic literature search was conducted on PubMED, Google Scholar and IEEExplore.

AREAS OF AGREEMENT:

Retinal prostheses play a part in restoring vision in blind RP patients providing stable, safe and long-term retinal stimulation.

AREAS OF CONTROVERSY:

Objective improvement in visual function does not always translate into consistent improvement in the patient's quality of life. Controversy exists over the use of an external image-capturing device versus internally placed photodiode devices.

GROWING POINTS:

The alpha-IMS, a photovoltaic-based retinal prosthesis recently obtained its CE marking in July 2013.

AREAS TIMELY FOR DEVELOPING RESEARCH:

Improvement in retinal prosthetic vision depends on: (i) improving visual resolution, (ii) improving the visual field, (iii) developing an accurate neural code for image processing and (iv) improving the biocompatibility of the device to ensure longevity.

KEYWORDS:

artificial retina; prosthetic vision; retinal prosthesis; retinitis pigmentosa; therapy

PMID:
24526779
DOI:
10.1093/bmb/ldu002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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