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J Assist Reprod Genet. 2014 Apr;31(4):485-91. doi: 10.1007/s10815-014-0186-3. Epub 2014 Feb 14.

Low testosterone levels in women with diminished ovarian reserve impair embryo implantation rate: a retrospective case-control study.

Author information

1
Reproductive Medical Center, Peking University, People's Hospital, No. 11 Xizhimen South Street, Western District, Beijing, 100044, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the association of basal testosterone (T) levels with the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in women with diminished ovarian reserve (DOR).

METHODS:

Complete clinical data on the first 223 IVF cycles in women with DOR were retrospectively analyzed. The associations of basal follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol, and T levels with ovarian response and IVF outcome were studied.

RESULTS:

Basal T levels were significantly different between pregnant and non-pregnant women. However, basal T levels showed no correlation with controlled ovarian hyperstimulation parameters after adjusting for age. The association of basal T levels with pregnancy rate was significant after adjusting for other impact factors. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the basal T level of 1.115 nmol/L for predicting pregnancy outcome had a sensitivity of 82.80 % and specificity of 58.09 %. The women were divided into two groups based on this value; although the clinical characteristics and ovarian stimulation parameters were similar, the clinical pregnancy (16.18 % (11/68) vs. 40.15 % (53/132), respectively, pā€‰=ā€‰0.000) and implantation rates (10.07 % (15/149) vs. 22.41 % (65/290), respectively, pā€‰=ā€‰0.002) were significantly different in the low and high T level groups.

CONCLUSION:

In women with DOR, the basal T level presented a positive association with pregnancy outcome in IVF. The poor reproductive outcome observed in women with lower basal T levels may be due to the decreased implantation rate.

PMID:
24526354
PMCID:
PMC3969473
DOI:
10.1007/s10815-014-0186-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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