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J Wound Care. 2014 Feb;23(2):66-7, 70, 72.

Development of an in vitro fibrin clot model to evaluate fibrinolytic agents for wound care application.

Author information

1
PhD, Research Engineer, Engineering and Cutaneous Biology Laboratory, UMR 1098, University of Franche-Comte, France.
2
Industrial Pharmacist, URGO Laboratory, France.
3
Research Technician, Engineering and Cutaneous Biology Laboratory, UMR 1098, University of Franche-Comte, France.
4
MD, Dermatologist, Department of Dermatology, Besançon University Hospital, France.
5
MD, PhD, Hospital Practitioner, Engineering and Cutaneous Biology Laboratory, UMR 1098, University of Franche-Comte, France, Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Besançon University Hospital, France.
6
MD, PhD, Professor of Dermatology, Engineering and Cutaneous Biology Laboratory, UMR 1098, University of Franche-Comte, France, Department of Dermatology, Besançon University Hospital, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe an in vitro fibrin clot model that could reliably assess the fibrinolytic activity of enzymatic debriding agents for wound care application.

METHOD:

A model of a fibrin clot was reconstructed in vitro by mixture of human fibrinogen and (alpha)-thrombin supplemented with factor XIII. These clots were then treated with enzymatic ointments. Fibrinolytic activity was investigated by measuring D-dimer levels, using an automated immunoturbidimetric Liatest D-dimer assay.

RESULTS:

Collagenase and papain-urea ointments demonstrated fibrinolytic activity which was macroscopically visible. Their effect was identical on the in vitro reconstructed fibrin clot and ex vivo collected wound fibrin clot; collagenase and papain-urea both induced a complete degradation and dissolution of both fibrin clots after 24 hours of treatment. This was associated with an increase in D-dimer concentration.

CONCLUSION:

This reconstructed fibrin clot in vitro model has the potential to predict the efficacy of fibrinolytic agents and therefore appears to be a suitable model for in vitro assays.

DECLARATION OF INTEREST:

This study was supported by a grant from URGO Laboratory.

PMID:
24526082
DOI:
10.12968/jowc.2014.23.2.66
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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