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Antiviral Res. 2014 Apr;104:136-42. doi: 10.1016/j.antiviral.2014.02.001. Epub 2014 Feb 10.

Entry inhibitors and future treatment of hepatitis C.

Author information

1
Inserm U1110, Strasbourg, France; Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.
2
Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
3
Inserm U1110, Strasbourg, France; Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France; Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA; Pôle Hépato-digestif, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France. Electronic address: Thomas.Baumert@unistra.fr.

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, HCV-induced liver disease is the leading indication for liver transplantation. The recent introduction of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has revolutionized HCV treatment by making possible the cure of the majority of patients. However, their efficacy and safety in difficult-to-treat patients such as patients receiving immunosuppression, those with advanced liver disease, co-morbidity and HIV/HCV-co-infection remain to be determined. Furthermore, prevention of liver graft infection remains a pressing issue. HCV entry inhibitors target the very first step of the HCV life cycle and efficiently inhibit cell-cell transmission - a key prerequisite for viral spread. Because of their unique mechanism of action on cell-cell transmission they may provide a promising and simple perspective for prevention of liver graft infection. A high genetic barrier to resistance and complementary mechanism of action compared to DAAs makes entry inhibitors attractive as a new strategy for treatment of multi-resistant or difficult-to-treat patients. Clinical studies are needed to determine the future role of entry inhibitors in the arsenal of antivirals to combat HCV infection. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "Hepatitis C: next steps toward global eradication."

KEYWORDS:

Difficult-to-treat patients; Direct-acting antivirals; Entry inhibitors; Liver transplantation; Resistance

PMID:
24525381
DOI:
10.1016/j.antiviral.2014.02.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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