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Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2014 Apr 1;306(7):G622-30. doi: 10.1152/ajpgi.00372.2013. Epub 2014 Feb 13.

Fructose stimulates GLP-1 but not GIP secretion in mice, rats, and humans.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Sciences, NNF Centre for Basic Metabolic Research, the Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark;

Abstract

Nutrients often stimulate gut hormone secretion, but the effects of fructose are incompletely understood. We studied the effects of fructose on a number of gut hormones with particular focus on glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). In healthy humans, fructose intake caused a rise in blood glucose and plasma insulin and GLP-1, albeit to a lower degree than isocaloric glucose. Cholecystokinin secretion was stimulated similarly by both carbohydrates, but neither peptide YY3-36 nor glucagon secretion was affected by either treatment. Remarkably, while glucose potently stimulated GIP release, fructose was without effect. Similar patterns were found in the mouse and rat, with both fructose and glucose stimulating GLP-1 secretion, whereas only glucose caused GIP secretion. In GLUTag cells, a murine cell line used as model for L cells, fructose was metabolized and stimulated GLP-1 secretion dose-dependently (EC50 = 0.155 mM) by ATP-sensitive potassium channel closure and cell depolarization. Because fructose elicits GLP-1 secretion without simultaneous release of glucagonotropic GIP, the pathways underlying fructose-stimulated GLP-1 release might be useful targets for type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity drug development.

KEYWORDS:

enteroendocrine axis; gastric inhibitory peptide; glucagon-like peptide-1

PMID:
24525020
PMCID:
PMC3962593
DOI:
10.1152/ajpgi.00372.2013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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