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Asian J Psychiatr. 2014 Feb;7(1):52-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ajp.2013.10.018. Epub 2013 Nov 20.

Weight control in schizophrenic patients through Sakata's Charting of Daily Weight Pattern and its associations with temperament and character.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan. Electronic address: ryoei_miyoshi@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan.
3
Taniguchi Hospital, Miyazaki, Japan.

Abstract

AIM:

This study examined whether daily self-monitoring of weight and monthly interviews with a doctor improved eating habits and led to weight loss, and whether temperament and character traits affect weight change in persons with schizophrenia.

METHODS:

Participants used Sakata's Charting of Daily Weight Pattern to monitor their weight daily. In addition, Sakata's Eating Behavior Questionnaire was administered to evaluate eating-behavior awareness. The Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) was used to assess participants' temperament and character. Fifty patients were divided into two groups: the intervention group (n = 25) filled in Sakata's Charting of Daily Weight Pattern every day; was interviewed monthly by a doctor about weight management; was weighed monthly. The non-intervention group (n = 25) was only weighed monthly.

RESULTS:

The body mass index (mean ± standard error: 0.59 ± 0.10 kg/m(2), p < 0.001) of the intervention group decreased significantly while their scores on Sakata's Eating Behavior Questionnaire significantly improved albeit marginally. Conversely, body mass index increased significantly (0.66 ± 0.18 kg/m(2), p < 0.001) in the non-intervention group, whose scores on Sakata's Eating Behavior Questionnaire did not change significantly. Weight change and TCI scores were not correlated for the intervention group, but scores for "self-directedness" and weight gain in the non-intervention group had a marginally significant negative correlation (r = -0.33, p < 0.10).

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest that monitoring one's weight daily on Sakata's Charting of Daily Weight Pattern led to improvements in eating behavior and a decrease in BMI of patients with schizophrenia.

KEYWORDS:

Sakata's Charting of Daily Weight Pattern; Sakata's Eating Behavior Questionnaire; Schizophrenia; Temperament and Character Inventory; Weight control

PMID:
24524710
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajp.2013.10.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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