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Am J Public Health. 2014 Apr;104(4):e69-74. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2013.301850. Epub 2014 Feb 13.

State indoor tanning laws and adolescent indoor tanning.

Author information

1
Gery P. Guy Jr, Zahava Berkowitz, and Mona Saraiya are with the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA. Sherry Everett Jones, Emily O'Malley Olsen, and Shannon L. Michael are with the Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Justin N. Miyamoto is with the Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, WA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Recently, several state indoor tanning laws, including age restrictions, were promulgated to reduce indoor tanning among minors. We examined the effects of these laws on adolescent indoor tanning.

METHODS:

We used nationally representative data from the 2009 and 2011 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (nā€‰=ā€‰31ā€‰835). Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association between state indoor tanning laws and indoor tanning among US high school students.

RESULTS:

Female students in states with indoor tanning laws were less likely to engage in indoor tanning than those in states without any laws. We observed a stronger association among female students in states with systems access, parental permission, and age restriction laws than among those in states without any laws. We found no significant association among female students in states with only systems access and parental permission laws or among male students.

CONCLUSIONS:

Indoor tanning laws, particularly those including age restrictions, may be effective in reducing indoor tanning among female high school students, for whom rates are the highest. Such reductions have the potential to reduce the health and economic burden of skin cancer.

PMID:
24524515
PMCID:
PMC4025696
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2013.301850
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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