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Clin Perinatol. 2014 Mar;41(1):257-83. doi: 10.1016/j.clp.2013.10.003. Epub 2013 Dec 12.

The role of neuroimaging in predicting neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm neonates.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, 1 Park Street, West Pavilion, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.
2
The Division of Development and Growth, Department of Paediatrics, Children's Hospital Geneva, 6 rue Willy Donzé, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, 1 Park Street, West Pavilion, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; Department of Pediatric Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, 1 Park Street, West Pavilion, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.
4
The Division of Development and Growth, Department of Paediatrics, Children's Hospital Geneva, 6 rue Willy Donzé, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: petra.huppi@hcuge.ch.

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a safe and high-resolution neuroimaging modality that is increasingly used in the neonatal population to assess brain injury and its consequences on brain development. It is superior to cranial ultrasound for the definition of patterns of both white and gray matter maturation and injury and therefore has the potential to provide prognostic information on the neurodevelopmental outcomes of the preterm population. Furthermore, the development of sophisticated MRI strategies, including diffusion tensor imaging, resting state functional connectivity, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, may increase the prognostic value, helping to guide parental counseling and allocate early intervention services.

KEYWORDS:

DEHSI; DTI; MRI; Neurodevelopmental outcome; Periventricular leukomalacia; Preterm brain injury; White matter injury; fMRI

PMID:
24524459
DOI:
10.1016/j.clp.2013.10.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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