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Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:101023. doi: 10.1155/2014/101023. Epub 2014 Jan 12.

Heat shock protein 72 expressing stress in sepsis: unbridgeable gap between animal and human studies--a hypothetical "comparative" study.

Author information

1
Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital, School of Health Sciences, University of Crete, Voutes Area, 71110 Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
2
1st Department of Propaedeutic Internal Medicine, Laiko, University General Hospital, University of Athens, 17 Agiou Thoma, 115 27 Athens, Greece.
3
Department of Clinical Chemistry, School of Medicine, University of Crete, Voutes Area, 71110 Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
4
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, First Critical Care Department, Evaggelismos Hospital, Ipsilantou 45, 10676, Athens, Greece.

Abstract

Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) exhibits a protective role during times of increased risk of pathogenic challenge and/or tissue damage. The aim of the study was to ascertain Hsp72 protective effect differences between animal and human studies in sepsis using a hypothetical "comparative study" model. Forty-one in vivo (56.1%), in vitro (17.1%), or combined (26.8%) animal and 14 in vivo (2) or in vitro (12) human Hsp72 studies (P < 0.0001) were enrolled in the analysis. Of the 14 human studies, 50% showed a protective Hsp72 effect compared to 95.8% protection shown in septic animal studies (P < 0.0001). Only human studies reported Hsp72-associated mortality (21.4%) or infection (7.1%) or reported results (14.3%) to be nonprotective (P < 0.001). In animal models, any Hsp72 induction method tried increased intracellular Hsp72 (100%), compared to 57.1% of human studies (P < 0.02), reduced proinflammatory cytokines (28/29), and enhanced survival (18/18). Animal studies show a clear Hsp72 protective effect in sepsis. Human studies are inconclusive, showing either protection or a possible relation to mortality and infections. This might be due to the fact that using evermore purified target cell populations in animal models, a lot of clinical information regarding the net response that occurs in sepsis is missing.

PMID:
24524071
PMCID:
PMC3912989
DOI:
10.1155/2014/101023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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