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J Infect Dis. 2014 Jun 15;209(12):1972-80. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiu005. Epub 2014 Feb 11.

Reservoir targeted vaccine against Borrelia burgdorferi: a new strategy to prevent Lyme disease transmission.

Author information

1
University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center Biopeptides, Memphis, Tennessee.
2
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
3
University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center.
4
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York.
5
Division of High Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, One Health Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Abstract

A high prevalence of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi in ixodid ticks is correlated with a high incidence of Lyme disease. The transmission of B. burgdorferi to humans can be disrupted by targeting 2 key elements in its enzootic cycle: the reservoir host and the tick vector. In a prospective 5-year field trial, we show that oral vaccination of wild white-footed mice resulted in outer surface protein A-specific seropositivity that led to reductions of 23% and 76% in the nymphal infection prevalence in a cumulative, time-dependent manner (2 and 5 years, respectively), whereas the proportion of infected ticks recovered from control plots varied randomly over time. Significant decreases in tick infection prevalence were observed within 3 years of vaccine deployment. Implementation of such a long-term public health measure could substantially reduce the risk of human exposure to Lyme disease.

KEYWORDS:

Borrelia burgdorferi; Lyme disease; Oral vaccine; enzootic cycle; transmission; wildlife reservoir

PMID:
24523510
PMCID:
PMC4038139
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiu005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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