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Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2014 May;134(5):719-26. doi: 10.1007/s00402-014-1946-3. Epub 2014 Feb 13.

Fixation of the shorter cementless GTS™ stem: biomechanical comparison between a conventional and an innovative implant design.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Biomechanics and Implant Research, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118, Heidelberg, Germany, jan.nadorf@med.uni-heidelberg.de.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Conventional cementless total hip arthroplasty already shows very good clinical results. Nevertheless, implant revision is often accompanied by massive bone loss. The new shorter GTS™ stem has been introduced to conserve femoral bone stock. However, no long-term clinical results were available for this implant. A biomechanical comparison of the GTS™ stem with the clinically well-established CLS(®) stem was therefore preformed to investigate the targeted stem philosophy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Four GTS™ stems and four CLS(®) stems were implanted in a standardized manner in eight synthetic femurs. A high-precision measuring device was used to determine micromotions of the stem and bone during different load applications. Calculation of relative micromotions at the bone-implant interface allowed the rotational implant stability and the bending behavior of the stem to be determined.

RESULTS:

Lowest relative micromotions were detected near the lesser trochanter within the proximal part of both stems. Maximum relative micromotions were measured near the distal tip of the stems, indicating a proximal fixation of both stems. For the varus-valgus-torque application, a comparable stem bending behavior was shown for both stems.

CONCLUSION:

Both stems seem to provide a comparable and adequate primary stability. The shortened GTS™ design has a comparable rotational stability and bone-implant flexibility compared to a conventional stem. This study demonstrates that the CLS(®) stem and the GTS™ stem exhibit similar biomechanical behavior. However, a clinical confirmation of these experimental results is still required.

PMID:
24522862
DOI:
10.1007/s00402-014-1946-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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