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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014 May;133(5):1373-82. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2013.11.040. Epub 2014 Feb 9.

Peanut, milk, and wheat intake during pregnancy is associated with reduced allergy and asthma in children.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; Mindich Child Health and Development Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. Electronic address: supinda@post.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Mass; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
3
Asthma and Allergic Diseases Center, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Va.
4
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Mass.
5
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Mass; Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass.
6
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Mass; Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Mass.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Maternal diet during pregnancy may affect childhood allergy and asthma.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to examine the associations between maternal intake of common childhood food allergens during early pregnancy and childhood allergy and asthma.

METHODS:

We studied 1277 mother-child pairs from a US prebirth cohort unselected for any disease. Using food frequency questionnaires administered during the first and second trimesters, we assessed maternal intake of common childhood food allergens during pregnancy. In mid-childhood (mean age, 7.9 years), we assessed food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis by questionnaire and serum-specific IgE levels. We examined the associations between maternal diet during pregnancy and childhood allergy and asthma. We also examined the cross-sectional associations between specific food allergies, asthma, and atopic conditions in mid-childhood.

RESULTS:

Food allergy was common (5.6%) in mid-childhood, as was sensitization to at least 1 food allergen (28.0%). Higher maternal peanut intake (each additional z score) during the first trimester was associated with 47% reduced odds of peanut allergic reaction (odds ratio [OR], 0.53; 95% CI, 0.30-0.94). Higher milk intake during the first trimester was associated with reduced asthma (OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.69-0.99) and allergic rhinitis (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.74-0.97). Higher maternal wheat intake during the second trimester was associated with reduced atopic dermatitis (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.46-0.90). Peanut, wheat, and soy allergy were each cross-sectionally associated with increased childhood asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis (ORs, 3.6 to 8.1).

CONCLUSION:

Higher maternal intake of peanut, milk, and wheat during early pregnancy was associated with reduced odds of mid-childhood allergy and asthma.

KEYWORDS:

Maternal diet; allergic rhinitis; asthma; childhood; food allergy; milk; peanut; pregnancy; sensitization; wheat

PMID:
24522094
PMCID:
PMC4004710
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2013.11.040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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