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Mol Vis. 2014 Feb 7;20:153-62. eCollection 2014.

Epigallocatechin gallate eye drops protect against ultraviolet B-induced corneal oxidative damage in mice.

Author information

1
Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan, ROC.
2
Department of Biotechnology, TransWorld University, Douliu City, Taiwan, ROC.
3
School of Occupational Safety and Health, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan, ROC ; Department of Ophthalmology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan, ROC.
4
Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan, ROC ; Department of Ophthalmology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan, ROC.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation from sunlight is a known risk factor for human corneal injury. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on UVB radiation-induced corneal oxidative damage in male imprinting control region (ICR) mice.

METHODS:

Corneal oxidative damage was induced by exposure to UVB radiation at 560 μW/cm(2). The animals received 0%, 0.1%, and 0.01% EGCG eye drops at a 5 mg/ml dose, twice daily for 8 days. Corneal surface damage was graded according to smoothness and the extent of lissamine green staining. Corneal glutathione (GSH), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and protein carbonyl levels, as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and glutathione reductase (GSH-Rd) activity in the cornea, were measured to monitor corneal injury.

RESULTS:

UVB radiation caused significant damage to the corneas, including apparent corneal ulceration and severe epithelial exfoliation, leading to a decrease in SOD, catalase, GSH-Px, GSH-Rd, and GSH activity in the cornea. However, the corneal TBARS and protein carbonyls increased compared with the control group. Treatment with EGCG eye drops significantly (p<0.05) ameliorated corneal damage, increased SOD, catalase, GSH-Px, GSH-Rd, and GSH activity, and decreased the TBARS and protein carbonyls in the corneas compared with the UVB-treated group.

CONCLUSIONS:

EGCG eye drops exhibit potent protective effects on UVB radiation-induced corneal oxidative damage in mice, likely due to the increase in antioxidant defense system activity and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation.

PMID:
24520184
PMCID:
PMC3919670
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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