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Reprod Sci. 2014 Jul;21(7):823-836. Epub 2014 Feb 11.

Advances in the Pathogenesis of Adhesion Development: The Role of Oxidative Stress.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, CS Mott Center for Human Growth and Development, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Wayne State University, School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, CS Mott Center for Human Growth and Development, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USA.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, CS Mott Center for Human Growth and Development, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Wayne State University, School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA Department of Physiology, Program for Reproductive Sciences, Wayne State University, School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA Karmanos Cancer Institute, Molecular Biology and Genetics Program, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA gsaed@med.wayne.edu.

Abstract

Over the past several years, there has been increasing recognition that pathogenesis of adhesion development includes significant contributions of hypoxia induced at the site of surgery, the resulting oxidative stress, and the subsequent free radical production. Mitochondrial dysfunction generated by surgically induced tissue hypoxia and inflammation can lead to the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as well as antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase which when optimal have the potential to abrogate mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, preventing the cascade of events leading to the development of adhesions in injured peritoneum. There is a significant cross talk between the several processes leading to whether or not adhesions would eventually develop. Several of these processes present avenues for the development of measures that can help in abrogating adhesion formation or reformation after intraabdominal surgery.

KEYWORDS:

adhesion markers; hypoxia; oxidative stress; postoperative adhesions

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