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Health Promot Pract. 2014 Sep;15(5):714-22. doi: 10.1177/1524839914521211. Epub 2014 Feb 11.

Novel methods to collect meaningful data from adolescents for the development of health interventions.

Author information

1
Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA play2PREVENT Lab, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Kimberly.hieftje@yale.edu.
2
play2PREVENT Lab, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
3
Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA play2PREVENT Lab, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.

Abstract

Health interventions are increasingly focused on young adolescents, and as a result, discussions with this population have become a popular method in qualitative research. Traditional methods used to engage adults in discussions do not translate well to this population, who may have difficulty conceptualizing abstract thoughts and opinions and communicating them to others. As part of a larger project to develop and evaluate a video game for risk reduction and HIV prevention in young adolescents, we were seeking information and ideas from the priority audience that would help us create authentic story lines and character development in the video game. To accomplish this authenticity, we conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with young adolescents aged 10 to 15 years and employed three novel methods: Storytelling Using Graphic Illustration, My Life, and Photo Feedback Project. These methods helped provide a thorough understanding of the adolescents' experiences and perspectives regarding their environment and future aspirations, which we translated into active components of the video game intervention. This article describes the processes we used and the valuable data we generated using these three engaging methods. These three activities are effective tools for eliciting meaningful data from young adolescents for the development of health interventions.

KEYWORDS:

adolescents; intervention; qualitative research; video game

PMID:
24519998
PMCID:
PMC4267885
DOI:
10.1177/1524839914521211
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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