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Eur J Immunol. 2014 Jun;44(6):1685-98. doi: 10.1002/eji.201343980. Epub 2014 Mar 19.

New insights into the role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in the function of CD11c⁺ cells during respiratory viral infection.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA.

Abstract

The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) has garnered considerable attention as a modulator of CD4(+) cell lineage development and function. It also regulates antiviral CD8(+) T-cell responses, but via indirect mechanisms that have yet to be determined. Here, we show that during acute influenza virus infection, AHR activation skews dendritic-cell (DC) subsets in the lung-draining lymph nodes, such that there are fewer conventional CD103(+) DCs and CD11b(+) DCs. Sorting DC subsets reveals AHR activation reduces immunostimulatory function of CD103(+) DCs in the mediastinal lymph nodes, and decreases their frequency in the lung. DNA-binding domain Ahr mutants demonstrate that alterations in DC subsets require the ligand-activated AHR to contain its inherent DNA-binding domain. To evaluate the intrinsic role of AHR in DCs, conditional knockouts were created using Cre-LoxP technology, which revealed that AHR in CD11c(+) cells plays a key role in controlling the acquisition of effector CD8(+) T cells in the infected lung. However, AHR within other leukocyte lineages contributes to diminished naïve CD8(+) T-cell activation in the draining lymphoid nodes. These findings indicate DCs are among the direct targets of AHR ligands in vivo, and AHR signaling modifies host responses to a common respiratory pathogen by affecting the complex interplay of multiple cell types.

KEYWORDS:

Antiviral immunity; CD8+ T cells; Dendritic cells (DCs); Influenza A virus

PMID:
24519489
PMCID:
PMC4048642
DOI:
10.1002/eji.201343980
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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