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Stroke. 2014 Apr;45(4):1148-50. doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.113.004032. Epub 2014 Feb 11.

Intakes of potassium, magnesium, and calcium and risk of stroke.

Author information

1
From the Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands (I.S., J.W.J.B., Y.T.v.d.S., D.E.G.); Department of Nutrition, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital A Paré, Université Versailles St-Quentin, Boulogne, France (S.C.); INSERM U1018, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Villejuif, France (S.C.); and Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands (J.M.A.B., W.M.M.V.).

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

We aimed to investigate the associations of dietary and total potassium, magnesium, and calcium intakes with stroke occurrence.

METHODS:

A prospective cohort study was conducted among 36 094 participants aged 21 to 70 years. Dietary intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire.

RESULTS:

During 12 years of follow-up, 631 strokes occurred. After adjustment for confounders, magnesium intake was associated with reduced stroke risk (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] per 100 mg/d, 0.80 [0.67-0.97] dietary magnesium; 0.78 [0.65-0.93] total magnesium). Potassium and calcium intakes were not associated with stroke.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study supports an association between high magnesium intake and a reduced stroke risk.

KEYWORDS:

calcium; magnesium; potassium; stroke

PMID:
24519410
DOI:
10.1161/STROKEAHA.113.004032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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