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Virulence. 2014 Apr 1;5(3):388-93. doi: 10.4161/viru.27912. Epub 2014 Feb 11.

In vivo correlates of molecularly inferred virulence among extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) in the wax moth Galleria mellonella model system.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences; University of Auckland; Auckland, New Zealand; Institute of Environmental Science and Research; Wellington, New Zealand; Maurice Wilkins Centre for Molecular Biodiscovery; University of Auckland; Auckland, New Zealand.
2
Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences; University of Auckland; Auckland, New Zealand.
3
Veterans Affairs Medical Center; Minneapolis, MN USA.
4
Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences; University of Auckland; Auckland, New Zealand; Maurice Wilkins Centre for Molecular Biodiscovery; University of Auckland; Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

In contrast to commensal Escherichia coli, extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strains possess an array of virulence-associated genes. We sought to establish the feasibility of using the invertebrate Galleria mellonella (greater wax moth) for assessing ExPEC virulence and to investigate the correlation between genotypic determinants of virulence and in vivo pathogenicity. We observed a correlation between the number of virulence genes and larval survival, such that ExPEC isolates with higher virulence scores killed larvae significantly faster than isolates with lower virulence scores. By correlating genotypic and phenotypic virulence, we provide preliminary validation of this model for future studies investigating ExPEC virulence.

KEYWORDS:

Escherichia coli; ExPEC; Galleria mellonella; in vivo; infection model; virulence

PMID:
24518442
PMCID:
PMC3979865
DOI:
10.4161/viru.27912
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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