Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Food Chem. 2014 Jul 1;154:44-51. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.12.101. Epub 2014 Jan 7.

Polyphenolic, polysaccharide and oligosaccharide composition of Tempranillo red wines and their relationship with the perceived astringency.

Author information

1
Grupo de Investigación en Polifenoles, Unidad de Nutrición y Bromatología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37007 Salamanca, Spain.
2
INRA, Joint Research Unit 1083, Sciences for Enology, 2 Place Pierre Viala, F-34060 Montpellier, France.
3
Grupo de Investigación en Polifenoles, Unidad de Nutrición y Bromatología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37007 Salamanca, Spain. Electronic address: escriban@usal.es.

Abstract

The influence of the proanthocyanidic, polysaccharide and oligosaccharide composition on astringency perception of Tempranillo wines has been evaluated. Statistical analyses revealed the existence of relationships between chemical composition and perceived astringency. Proanthocyanidic subunit distribution had the strongest contribution to the multiple linear regression (MLR) model. Polysaccharide families showed clear opposition to astringency perception according to principal component analysis (PCA) results, being stronger for mannoproteins and rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II), but only Polysaccharides Rich in Arabinose and Galactose (PRAGs) were considered in the final fitted MLR model, which explained 96.8% of the variability observed in the data. Oligosaccharides did not show a clear opposition, revealing that structure and size of carbohydrates are important for astringency perception. Mannose and galactose residues in the oligosaccharide fraction are positively related to astringency perception, probably because its presence is consequence of the degradation of polysaccharides.

KEYWORDS:

Astringency perception; Oligosaccharides; Polysaccharides; Proanthocyanidins; Red wine

PMID:
24518314
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.12.101
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center