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HIV Clin Trials. 2014 Jan-Feb;15(1):14-26. doi: 10.1310/hct1501-14.

Minorities remain underrepresented in HIV/AIDS research despite access to clinical trials.

Author information

1
University of Colorado-AMC, Aurora, Colorado.
2
Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.
3
Center for Biostatistics in AIDS Research, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York.
5
University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
6
Social and Scientific Systems, Silver Spring, Maryland.
7
Frontier Science & Technology Research Foundation, Inc, Amherst, New York.
8
Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York.
9
Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

The reasons for minority underrepresentation in HIV/AIDS clinical trials remain unclear. We aimed to evaluate the knowledge, experience, and factors that influence minority participation in HIV/AIDS studies in the United States.

METHODS:

An anonymous, bilingual, self-administered survey on study participation was given to HIV-infected adults attending AIDS Clinical Trials Group-affiliated clinics in the United States and Puerto Rico. Chi-square tests were used to evaluate differences by race, first language, and level of education. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for factors associated with being talked to about participation in a study.

RESULTS:

We analyzed 2,175 complete surveys (221 in Spanish). Among respondents, 31% were White, 40% were Black/African American (AA), and 21% were Hispanic. The overall rate of previous participation in any HIV/AIDS study was 48%. Hispanics were less likely to know about studies compared to Whites and AAs (67% vs 74% and 76%, respectively; P < .001). Compared to Whites, AAs and Hispanics were less likely to have been talked to about participating in a study (76% vs 67% and 67%, respectively; P < .001). The OR for being talked to about participating in a study was 0.65 (95% CI, 0.52-0.81) for AAs and 0.65 (95% CI, 0.49-0.85) for Hispanics, compared to Whites. AAs and Hispanics were more likely to state that studies were not friendly to their race (17% and 10% vs 4%; P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Minorities continue to face barriers for HIV/AIDS trial participation, even when clinical research is available. Enrollment strategies should better target minorities to improve recruitment in HIV/AIDS research.

KEYWORDS:

AIDS; HIV; clinical trials; minority; research participation; underrepresented

PMID:
24518211
PMCID:
PMC4031907
DOI:
10.1310/hct1501-14
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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