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Prev Med. 2014 May;62:179-81. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.01.026. Epub 2014 Feb 8.

Recommended school policies are associated with student sugary drink and fruit and vegetable intake.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine & Community Health, Program in Health Disparities Research, University of Minnesota, 717 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414, USA. Electronic address: msnanney@umn.edu.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, West Bank Office Building 1300 S. Second Street, Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA. Electronic address: macl0029@umn.edu.
3
School of Nursing, PHS Room 5-140 WDH, 308 Harvard St. SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. Electronic address: kubik002@umn.edu.
4
Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Biostatistical Design and Analysis Center, University of Minnesota, 717 Delaware St. SE, Suite 140, Minneapolis, MN 55414, USA. Electronic address: davey002@umn.edu.
5
Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Biostatistical Design and Analysis Center, University of Minnesota, 717 Delaware St. SE, Suite 140, Minneapolis, MN 55414, USA. Electronic address: coomb0054@umn.edu.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, West Bank Office Building 1300 S. Second Street, Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA. Electronic address: tfnelson@umn.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the association between 8 recommended school obesity-related policies and student behaviors and weight in a cohort of Minnesota schools.

METHOD:

Existing surveillance surveys were used to examine the relationship between school policies to promote healthy eating and physical activity and student weight, diet, and activity behaviors from 2002 to 2006 among students (n=18,881) in a cohort of 37 Minnesota junior-senior high and high schools using fixed effects linear regression models.

RESULTS:

Each additional recommended policy was associated with a significant decrease in consumption of sugary drinks and an increase in consumption of fruits and vegetables. There were no associations with weekly hours of sedentary activities, days per week of vigorous activity, or body mass index percentile.

CONCLUSION:

Students attending schools that added recommended policies to promote healthy eating showed improved dietary behaviors, independent of secular trends compared with students in schools that did not add recommended policies.

KEYWORDS:

School nutrition policies; School policy evaluations; Student BMI percentile

PMID:
24518003
PMCID:
PMC3988251
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.01.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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