Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2014 Mar-Apr;42:43-50. doi: 10.1016/j.ntt.2014.01.007. Epub 2014 Feb 7.

Correspondence of parent report and laboratory measures of inattention and hyperactivity in children with heavy prenatal alcohol exposure.

Author information

1
Center for Behavioral Teratology, Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, 6330 Alvarado Court, Suite 100, San Diego, CA 92120, USA. Electronic address: lglass@mail.sdsu.edu.
2
Center for Behavioral Teratology, Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, 6330 Alvarado Court, Suite 100, San Diego, CA 92120, USA. Electronic address: dgraham@mail.sdsu.edu.
3
Center for Behavioral Teratology, Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, 6330 Alvarado Court, Suite 100, San Diego, CA 92120, USA. Electronic address: bdeweese@mail.sdsu.edu.
4
University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, San Diego, CA 92093, USA. Electronic address: klyons@ucsd.edu.
5
Center for Behavioral Teratology, Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, 6330 Alvarado Court, Suite 100, San Diego, CA 92120, USA. Electronic address: eriley@mail.sdsu.edu.
6
Center for Behavioral Teratology, Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, 6330 Alvarado Court, Suite 100, San Diego, CA 92120, USA. Electronic address: sarah.mattson@sdsu.edu.

Abstract

Clinical research and practice support a multi-method approach to validating behavioral problems in children. We examined whether parent-reported symptoms of hyperactivity and inattention (using the Disruptive Behavior Disorder Rating Scale) were substantiated by objective laboratory measures [hyperactivity measured by wrist-worn actigraphy (ACT) and inattention assessed using a 20-minute continuous performance task (CPT)] in three age- and demographically-matched groups of school-age children: children with prenatal alcohol exposure (AE), non-exposed children with idiopathic ADHD (ADHD), and controls (CON). Results indicated that the clinical groups (AE, ADHD) had significantly higher parent-reported levels for both domains compared to the CON group, and did not differ from each other. On the laboratory measures, the clinical groups were more inattentive than controls on the CPT, but did not differ from each other. In contrast, the ADHD group had higher objective activity on the ACT than AE and CON, which did not differ from each other. Thus, laboratory measures differentially validated parent reports in a group-dependent manner. Actigraphy substantiated parent-reported hyperactivity for children in the ADHD group but not for children in the AE group, while the CPT validated parent-reported inattention for both clinical groups. Although the majority of children in the AE group met the criteria for ADHD, objective activity levels were not different from controls, indicating that hyperactivity may be a less prominent feature in the AE group. Thus, while there is considerable overlap between the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure and ADHD, differences in behavioral profiles may be clinically useful in differential diagnosis. Further, these data indicate that objective measures should be used to validate parent reports.

KEYWORDS:

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD); Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS); Hyperactivity; Inattention; Prenatal alcohol exposure

PMID:
24512965
PMCID:
PMC3989839
DOI:
10.1016/j.ntt.2014.01.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center