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J Subst Abuse Treat. 2014 May-Jun;46(5):592-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2014.01.001. Epub 2014 Jan 13.

Phone-delivered brief motivational interventions for mandated college students delivered during the summer months.

Author information

1
Mental Health and Behavioral Sciences Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 830 Chalkstone Avenue, Providence, RI 02908; Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Box G-S121-5, Providence, RI 02912. Electronic address: Brian_Borsari@brown.edu.
2
Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Box G-S121-5, Providence, RI 02912.
3
Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Public Health Sciences, A210, 600 Centerview Drive, Hershey, PA 17033.
4
Mental Health and Behavioral Sciences Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 830 Chalkstone Avenue, Providence, RI 02908; Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Box G-S121-5, Providence, RI 02912.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Across the United States, tens of thousands of college students are mandated to receive an alcohol intervention following an alcohol policy violation. Telephone interventions may be an efficient method to provide mandated students with an intervention, especially when they are away from campus during summer vacation. However, little is known about the utility of telephone-delivered brief motivational interventions.

METHOD:

Participants in the study (N=57) were college students mandated to attend an alcohol program following a campus-based alcohol citation. Participants were randomized to a brief motivational phone intervention (pBMI) (n=36) or assessment only (n=21). Ten participants (27.8%) randomized to the pBMI did not complete the intervention. Follow-up assessments were conducted 3, 6, and 9 months post-intervention.

RESULTS:

Results indicated the pBMI significantly reduced the number of alcohol-related problems compared to the assessment-only group. Participants who did not complete the pBMI appeared to be lighter drinkers at baseline and randomization, suggesting the presence of alternate influences on alcohol-related problems.

CONCLUSION:

Phone BMIs may be an efficient and cost-effective method to reduce harms associated with alcohol use by heavy-drinking mandated students during the summer months.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol; Mandated college students; Motivational interviewing

PMID:
24512944
PMCID:
PMC3972287
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsat.2014.01.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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