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Am J Prev Med. 2014 Mar;46(3 Suppl 1):S87-97. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2013.10.026.

The influence of health disparities on targeting cancer prevention efforts.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, National Institute on Aging, NIH, Baltimore, Maryland.
2
Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, National Institute on Aging, NIH, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address: me42v@nih.gov.

Abstract

Despite the advances in cancer medicine and the resultant 20% decline in cancer death rates for Americans since 1991, there remain distinct cancer health disparities among African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, and the those living in poverty. Minorities and the poor continue to bear the disproportionate burden of cancer, especially in terms of stage at diagnosis, incidence, and mortality. Cancer health disparities are persistent reminders that state-of-the-art cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment are not equally effective for and accessible to all Americans. The cancer prevention model must take into account the phenotype of accelerated aging associated with health disparities as well as the important interplay of biological and sociocultural factors that lead to disparate health outcomes. The building blocks of this prevention model will include interdisciplinary prevention modalities that encourage partnerships across medical and nonmedical entities, community-based participatory research, development of ethnically and racially diverse research cohorts, and full actualization of the prevention benefits outlined in the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. However, the most essential facet should be a thoughtful integration of cancer prevention and screening into prevention, screening, and disease management activities for hypertension and diabetes mellitus because these chronic medical illnesses have a substantial prevalence in populations at risk for cancer disparities and cause considerable comorbidity and likely complicate effective treatment and contribute to disproportionate cancer death rates.

PMID:
24512936
PMCID:
PMC4431696
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2013.10.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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