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CNS Spectr. 2014 Feb;19(1):69-89. doi: 10.1017/S1092852913000801.

New developments in human neurocognition: clinical, genetic, and brain imaging correlates of impulsivity and compulsivity.

Author information

1
1 Hertfordshire Partnership NHS University Foundation Trust, Queen Elizabeth II Hospital, Howlands, Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire, UK.
2
3 School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge University, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK.
3
5 Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Institute for Addiction Research, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
4
7 Department of Psychiatry, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
5
8 Department of Animals in Science and Society, Division of Behavioural Neuroscience, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
6
10 Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute (BCNI), University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
7
12 INSERM UMR894 (Centre of Psychiatry and Neuroscience), Paris, France.
8
15 Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
9
17 Departments of Psychiatry and Pharmacology and Toxicology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia, USA.
10
18 Departments of Psychiatry, Child Study and Neurobiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Abstract

Impulsivity and compulsivity represent useful conceptualizations that involve dissociable cognitive functions, which are mediated by neuroanatomically and neurochemically distinct components of cortico-subcortical circuitry. The constructs were historically viewed as diametrically opposed, with impulsivity being associated with risk-seeking and compulsivity with harm-avoidance. However, they are increasingly recognized to be linked by shared neuropsychological mechanisms involving dysfunctional inhibition of thoughts and behaviors. In this article, we selectively review new developments in the investigation of the neurocognition of impulsivity and compulsivity in humans, in order to advance our understanding of the pathophysiology of impulsive, compulsive, and addictive disorders and indicate new directions for research.

PMID:
24512640
PMCID:
PMC4113335
DOI:
10.1017/S1092852913000801
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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