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Eur J Immunol. 2014 Feb;44(2):348-51. doi: 10.1002/eji.201344375.

Gimap and T cells: a matter of life or death.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Immune Cell Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Abstract

GTPase immune-associated proteins (Gimap) genes encode evolutionarily conserved GTP-binding proteins that are preferentially expressed in immune cells. Specific members have been shown to be involved in lymphocyte development, or are associated with inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, the function of these proteins remains poorly understood, both at the cellular and molecular levels. A new study in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology [Eur. J. Immunol. 2014. 44: 561-572] points to the distinct but partly overlapping functions of two members of this family, Gimap3 and Gimap5, and offers new insight into their potential functions in T cells.

KEYWORDS:

Bcl-2; GTPase immune-associated proteins; T-cell survival; auto-immunity; lymphopenia

PMID:
24510500
PMCID:
PMC4005041
DOI:
10.1002/eji.201344375
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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