Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Health Place. 2014 May;27:1-8. doi: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2014.01.006. Epub 2014 Jan 24.

Neighborhood context and the Hispanic health paradox: differential effects of immigrant density on children׳s wheezing by poverty, nativity and medical history.

Author information

1
Department of Sociology & Anthropology, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave, El Paso, Texas 79968, USA. Electronic address: youngank@uci.edu.
2
Department of Sociology & Anthropology, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave, El Paso, Texas 79968, USA. Electronic address: twcollins@utep.edu.
3
Department of Sociology & Anthropology, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave, El Paso, Texas 79968, USA. Electronic address: segrineski@utep.edu.

Abstract

Prior research suggests that immigrant enclaves provide respiratory health benefits for US Hispanic residents. We test if immigrant enclaves provide differential respiratory health benefits for Hispanic children in El Paso (Texas) based on individual-level factors. Results reveal that higher neighborhood immigrant density is associated with reduced odds of wheezing, but that the protective immigrant enclave effect is modified by poverty, general health status, body mass index (BMI), and caretaker nativity. Higher immigrant density is significantly more protective for poor children and those with foreign-born caretakers; conversely, it is significantly less protective for children in worse health and those with higher BMI. These findings foster a novel understanding of how immigrant enclaves may be differentially protective for Hispanic children based on individual-level factors.

KEYWORDS:

Asthma; Children; Hispanic health paradox; Multilevel models; Neighborhood effects

PMID:
24509419
PMCID:
PMC4924802
DOI:
10.1016/j.healthplace.2014.01.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center