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Forensic Sci Int. 2014 Mar;236:175-80. doi: 10.1016/j.forsciint.2013.12.040. Epub 2014 Jan 11.

Facial soft tissue thickness differences among three skeletal classes in Japanese population.

Author information

1
Department of Legal Medicine, School of Medicine, Tokyo Women's Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: hazimeu@research.twmu.ac.jp.
2
Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Matsumoto Dental University, 1780 GobaraHirooka, Shiojiri, Nagano, Japan.
3
Department of Oral Radiology, School of Dentistry, Matsumoto Dental University, 1780 GobaraHirooka, Shiojiri, Nagano, Japan.
4
Department of Legal Medicine, School of Medicine, Tokyo Women's Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

Facial reconstruction is used in forensic anthropology to recreate the face from unknown human skeletal remains, and to elucidate the antemortem facial appearance. This requires accurate assessment of the skull (age, sex, ancestry, etc.) and thickness data. However, additional information is required to reconstruct the face as the information obtained from the skull is limited. Here, we aimed to examine the information from the skull that is required for accurate facial reconstruction. The human facial profile is classified into 3 shapes: straight, convex, and concave. These facial profiles facilitate recognition of individuals. The skeletal classes used in orthodontics are classified according to these 3 facial types. We have previously reported the differences between Japanese females. In the present study, we applied this classification for facial tissue measurement, compared the differences in tissue depth of each skeletal class for both sexes in the Japanese population, and elucidated the differences between the skeletal classes.

KEYWORDS:

Facial profile; Facial reconstruction; Facial soft tissue thickness; Forensic anthropology; Skeletal classes

PMID:
24509238
DOI:
10.1016/j.forsciint.2013.12.040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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