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J Electrocardiol. 2014 May-Jun;47(3):316-23. doi: 10.1016/j.jelectrocard.2013.12.008. Epub 2013 Dec 18.

Rapid slowing of the atrial fibrillatory rate after administration of AZD7009 predicts conversion of atrial fibrillation.

Author information

1
AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden. Electronic address: maria.aunes@astrazeneca.com.
2
OUH Svendborg Sygehus, Svendborg, Denmark.
3
AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden.
4
Department of Electrical and Information Technology and Center for Integrative Electrocardiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
5
Sahlgrenska Academy at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Effects on the atrial fibrillatory rate (AFR) were studied during infusion with the combined potassium and sodium channel blocker AZD7009.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) were randomized to AZD7009 or placebo. Thirty-five patients converted to sinus rhythm (SR) and were matched to 35 non-converters. The mean AFR before conversion was 231 fibrillations per minute (fpm), having decreased by 41%; in non-converters, it was 296 fpm at the end of infusion, having decreased by 26%. The rate of decrease was greater in converters at 5 min, -88 vs. -66 fpm (p=0.02), and at 10 min, -133 vs. -111 fpm (p=0.048). The AFR-SD and the exponential decay decreased. A small left atrial area was the only baseline predictor of conversion to SR.

CONCLUSIONS:

AZD7009 produced a significantly more rapid decrease of the AFR in converters than in non-converters, but the AFR at baseline was not predictive of conversion.

KEYWORDS:

AZD7009; Atrial fibrillation; Atrial fibrillatory rate; Conversion

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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